The King in the Kitchen

  • Unit 4 – Puzzles & Mysteries

     

    Concept Question: Is there an explanation for everything?

     

    Week 3 – The King in the Kitchen

     

    Weekly Question

    Vocabulary Words

    Skills & Strategy

    Spelling Words

    How can a mistake turn into a success?

    advertising

    Character & Setting 

    brother

    supper

    concentrate

    Dictionary / Glossary

    together

    pitcher

    secret

    dinner

    filter

    duke

    Graphic Sources

    popular

    hangar

    dungeon

    Monitor & Fix

    center

    never

    furiously

    Pronouns & Antecedents

    calendar

    shelter

    genius

    similar

    cellar

    majesty

     

    regular

    caterpillar

    noble

     

    summer

    theater

    peasant

     

    clever

    deliver

    porridge

     

    Challenge Spelling Words

    exiled

     

    character

    spectacular

    inferior

     

    singular

    binocular

    treasury

     

    receiver

     

     

    Concept Vocabulary

    How are these concepts related?  In order to be an inventor, why would you need selling ideas?  What type of work ethic should you have?

                                 Innovators             

                                     -       -

                                 -               -

                           -                          -

              Selling Ideas                    Work

                       |                                   |

                       |                                   |

                advertising                     concentrate   - -  secret

     

    Characters & Setting

    Think back to the story The Houdini Box.  What character traits would you use to describe Victor?  What does Victor do or say in the story to support those traits?

     

    • Characters - people (sometimes animals) in a story

          - important to notice what character say and do in a

            story as well as how they interact with other

            characters

          - looking baack over a text helps you get a better idea

            of what a character is like

            What Character Says        -

                                                          -     

                                                               -  

            What Character Does  -   -   -   -   -   -    CHARACTER

                                                               -

                                                          -

            How Character Interacts   -

     

    • Setting - when & where a story takes place

     

    Vocab Strategy: Dictionary / Glossary

    Use a dictionary or glossary to find out the meaning of an unknown word.

    1.  Look at the first letter in the unfamiliar word.

    2. Open the dictionary or glossary to the section for that letter.  (Remember the words will be in alphabetical order.)

    3.  Find the word.

    4. Read the entry for the word.  If the word has more than one meaning, decide which meaning fits in the sentence. 

    5. Try that meaning in the sentence to see if it makes sense.


    Vocabulary Game --> http://www.quia.com/rr/399945.html



    Graphic Sources

    Remember graphic sources are important pieces of your reading.  They can be pictures, graphs, charts, timelines, etc. and usually have captions to explain them.  Graphic sources often give information that is not in the text. 

    Do not skip over graphic sources!

     

    Build Background Knowledge

    Print out the chart below called Build Background - prediction chart.  Take a picture walk through the story to complete the chart.  When finished reading The King in the Kitchen finish filling out the chart.

     

    Vocabulary Matching

    Print out the vocabulary cards below to play a concentration-type game.  Match the correct vocabulary word to its definition.

     

     

    Summarize Story Elements

    See if you can go through The King in the Kitchen and determine the story elements:

    Characters, Setting, Plot, Theme

    Characters - who is in the story

    Setting - when & where the story takes place

    Plot - the problem the characters face, the events that happen when they try to solve the problem, the resolution to the problem (how was it fixed?)

    Theme - the lesson or moral the characters learned

     

    Another way to easily summarize a fictional story is to use 5 MAGIC WORDS:

    SOMEBODY

     

    WANTED

     

    BUT

     

    SO

     

    THEN

     

    Interactive Story Elements 

    http://www.learner.org/interactives/story/cinderella.html


    Inventions

    To read about interesting inventions click on the links below.

       

      Antecedents

       

      The King took the soup and threw it on the floor.

       

      What is the pronoun in the sentence?

      What does the pronoun refer to?

       

      • Pronoun - a word that take the place of a noun or nouns

            Ex: he, she, mine, them, they, we, us, you, I, it

      • Antecedent - the word or words that a pronoun replaces

       

      • A pronoun should agree with its antecedent in number and gender.

       

      • Before you use a pronoun, ask yourself:

            - Is the pronoun singular or plural? (number)

            - Is the pronoun masculine, feminine, or neuter?

               (gender)

       

      Interactive Pronoun Games

      https://sites.google.com/site/easygrammar4kids/pronouns


      Check out BigDog comments on pronouns & antecedents by clicking on the link below.

      http://aliscot.com/bigdog/agreement_pa.htm

      Take a quiz on pronouns & antecedents.

      http://www.newsobserver.com/content/media/2007/4/10/TGG-quiz10.index.html

       

      Punctuating Dialogue

      http://www.primaryresources.co.uk/english/powerpoints/Using_Speech_Marks.ppt

      Click on the worksheets below for practice.

       

      Rules for Punctuation Dialogue

      -         A comma usually separates the speaker from the quotation.

      -         Begin the first word of the quotation with a CAPITAL LETTER.

      -         Quotation marks surround the speaker’s words.

      -         Usually place end punctuation inside the quotation marks.

      -         Begin a new paragraph whenever there is a change of speakers.

      -         Ex: (Speaker first)  Isaiah exclaimed, “I love writing class!

      -         Ex: (Speaker last)   “I read this book already,” Hannah advised.

       

       

      Quote with ? or !

      -         When a quotation ends in a question mark or an exclamation, do not add a comma.

      -         Ex:  “Where are we going?  Devan asked.

       

       

      Interrupted Quote

       

      -         When a quotation is interrupted in the middle by the speaker end the first part of the quotation with quotation marks.  Begin the second part with quotation marks.  Use commas to separate the quotation from the speaker.

      -         Ex:  “Oh no,” Sam declared, “I missed my bus!

       

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